• Home
  • Religion
  • James Patrick's Andrew of Bethsaida and the Johannine Circle: The Muratorian PDF

James Patrick's Andrew of Bethsaida and the Johannine Circle: The Muratorian PDF

By James Patrick

ISBN-10: 1433120259

ISBN-13: 9781433120251

This booklet is a analyzing of the textual content of the Gospel of John in gentle of a practice of Johannine authorship represented via the Muratorian Fragment, Papias of Hierapolis, and the Anti-Marcionite Prologue, all that are taken to mirror the impression of a typical culture represented through Jerome, Clement of Alexandria, and Victorinus of Pettau. Taken jointly those recommend that the Gospel of John used to be the paintings of the overdue first- or early second-century John the Presbyter who mediated the culture of a particular workforce of Johannine disciples between whom Andrew was once most vital.

Show description

Read Online or Download Andrew of Bethsaida and the Johannine Circle: The Muratorian Tradition and the Gospel Text (Studies in Biblical Literature, Volume 153) PDF

Similar religion books

Read e-book online A Nun on the Bus: How All of Us Can Create Hope, Change, and PDF

In the summertime of 2012, Sister Simone Campbell and a bunch of fellow Roman Catholic nuns toured elements of the rustic to rally aid opposed to Congressman Paul Ryan's funds, a plan that reduce important social courses for the hurting negative and the suffering center type. Prayer teams changed into rallies, and small city conferences grew to become nationwide media occasions.

Ben-Zion Rosenfeld's Torah Centers and Rabbinic Activity in Palestine 70 - 400 PDF

This publication comprises pioneering study on features of society, tradition and geography of rabbinic Torah facilities in Palestine 70-400 CE. It surveys the background of the facilities of their geographic and social context in chronological order.

Download e-book for iPad: He Has Opened Nisaba's House of Learning: Studies in Honor by Leonhard Sassmannshausen, Georg Neumann

In He has Opened Nisaba’s residence of studying twenty-six students honor Åke Sjöberg, professor emeritus of Assyriology on the college of Pennsylvania and previous editor of the Pennsylvania Sumerian Dictionary. The twenty-one reviews incorporated specialise in Mesopotamian knowledge literature, spiritual texts, cultural techniques, the background of writing, fabric tradition, society, and legislations from the discovery of writing to the Hellenistic interval.

Extra info for Andrew of Bethsaida and the Johannine Circle: The Muratorian Tradition and the Gospel Text (Studies in Biblical Literature, Volume 153)

Sample text

2 Raymond Brown, although tending to the traditional view that the Beloved Disciple was John the son of Zebedee, wrote: If these are his memories, they survived even though they were quite often unlike the memories that went into the Petrine kerygma that underlies Mark, and through Mark influenced Matthew and Luke. In other words, John’s historical tradition is something of a challenge to the general tradition shared by the Synoptics. Does it not seem likely that the man behind it would have been a man of real authority in 3 the Church, a man of status not unlike Peter’s?

15 Certainly the Johannine prologue was mined by the great Gnostics, and the anti-Gnostic concerns of the author of the Epistles is patent. Indeed 1 John can be read, effortlessly, as a sustained, point by point, argument against a kind of proto-Gnosticism, beginning as it does with the denial that there is darkness in God (1:5), a doctrine intrinsic to many kinds of gnosis, and going on to insist that sin is not rendered moot by illumination but is real, must be confessed, and is only expiated by the blood of Jesus (1:6–10, 2:1–2, 3:4–9); that the anointing given by the Holy Spirit is better than Gnostic ‘knowledge’ (2:20–21); and that the incarnation is real; Jesus came in the flesh (2:22, 4:2–3), the denial of this truth being the mark of antichrist.

The text seems to run shy of making a specific claim similar to that of 19:35, while at the same time, especially with the use of the aorist of the verb handled (ἐψηλάφησαν), which bears the meaning “to reach out and touch,” it obviates the interpretation that what John and others had seen was phenomenal or ‘spiritual’ in the Gnostic sense. Furthermore, there is something formulaic about the sequence “we have heard,…. ” I R E N A E U S : A P O L O GE T I C A M B I G U I T Y 29 The dramatic introductory sentences of the First Epistle are directed toward the denial of the novel proposition that was in various ways at the heart of the Gnostic systems: against Valentinus’ conviction that there was evil within the pleroma, against the belief of Marcion and Cerinthus that the creator was evil.

Download PDF sample

Andrew of Bethsaida and the Johannine Circle: The Muratorian Tradition and the Gospel Text (Studies in Biblical Literature, Volume 153) by James Patrick


by William
4.0

Rated 4.18 of 5 – based on 12 votes